Aging garage door springs cause the door to effectively "weigh" more as the steel loses its resiliency. With new springs, a heavy garage door should take no more than about 10 pounds of force to lift into an open position. With springs nearing the end of their lifespan, the force required to lift the door can be considerably more, since a garage door may weigh 200 pounds or more.
The tricky parts of the job involve you carrying the tension of the spring. Replacing a spring requires that you first unwind the spring to relieve the tension, then wind it back up and secure it while it's under tension. Winding bars are used for all winding and unwinding actions—don't try to save a few bucks by substituting long screwdrivers or pieces of rebar for the real winding bars. Substitute tools are much more likely to slip, or they may bend or break under the load of the spring.

If you’ve tested and tried to remedy these other problems and you’re still having issues, you may need to reprogram your transmitter. All transmitters have a learn button somewhere on the remote, so first you’ll need to locate that on your transmitter. Press and hold the learn button for a few seconds until the indicator light starts blinking. While the light is blinking, press your remote button again to reprogram that remote.

Start your garage door spring replacement project by getting a rough measurement of your springs (length and diameter). Then measure the width and height of your door. Make sure the quote includes the trip charge, parts and labor. Then ask for a price based on 7x19 lift cables and double-life springs. Those items will give you more years of service and should only add $65 to the price.
When you know you’re in range and the door still won’t open, check to make sure the antenna is hanging down from the motor inside your garage and nothing is blocking it. Your antenna must be free from any obstruction to clearly receive the signal to open and close the door. Also inspect the antenna for any signs of damage. If it looks like there has been damage to the antenna, you’ll need to call your garage door technician to come out and replace it.
9.4 Slide the end of the shaft into the end bearing plate. Tighten the set screws an additional 1/4 to 1/2 turns beyond the point you finger-tightened them. Add an additional 1/4 turn if you could not find the original set screw indentations in the previous step. Heavier wooden garage doors may require an additional 1/4 turn. Caution: Under-tightening the drums could cause the drum to slip and the door to cock or fall. Over-tightening the set screws could damage the shaft or drum, resulting in the same problems. This is a critical step.
11.2a Raise the garage door slowly. Check the door balance. If you have the correct springs the door should stay down when closed, half way when opened half way, and open when opened. If the door will drop to the floor by itself from the halfway point, add 1/4 turn of tension to each of the torsion springs. If the garage door won't stay on the floor, and if it pulls itself up when stopped halfway, close the door and remove 1/4 turn of tension from the springs.

Garage Door Repair How Much Centennial Co


Over time, the springs in your garage door can wear down and break. While the average cost to repair garage door springs is between $100 and $200, in some cases you may need to replace them instead. Replacement can cost $20-$30 for springs plus labor which can cost up to $180. Here are some signs to watch out for when determining whether repair or replacement is the right course of action:
We also have a wide range of expertise repairing and installing both residential and commercial doors, meaning we can tackle any problem, large or small. We carry a wide range of doors from one of the industry’s leading manufacturers, Clopay, so you can make the choice that makes the most sense for your home and family while feeling confident that you are getting a door of the highest quality.
A garage door spring replacement should cost between $175 and $225 for a single tension spring and between $250 and $300 for two tension springs. Most garage door companies carry a wide enough variety of spring sizes to cover most residential doors. As long as the proper amount of turns are put on the spring, there are more than one correct springs to use for any one door.
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