Install new or use this pair of left Install new or use this pair of left and right-wound torsion springs to replace broken sectional garage door torsion springs. All DURA-LIFT springs meet the DASMA standard rating of 10 000 plus door open and close cycles. Both the winding and stationary cones are professionally installed for safe operation. Winding ...  More + Product Details Close
Extension springs are long, lighter-weight springs that run perpendicular to the door and are mounted above the horizontal portions of the door tracks. These springs are tensioned by stretching out, using cables and pulleys, as with the torsion system. Because extension springs are merely suspended between two brackets (they are not mounted to a rod, like torsion springs), they must have a safety cable running through each spring. This helps contain the spring in the event of a breakage. Without the safety cable, a spring breaking under tension is a very serious safety hazard. If you have old springs that don't have safety cables, you should install them even if you aren't replacing the springs.
We have the best team of expert professionals who know how to handle each and every type of garage door and its components. This is because all of our technicians go through a rigorous train-ing process, covering every known garage door repair technique. We do not let them onto the field until we know that they are completely trained, and can perform a job to perfection. Aside from this, they are continually updated with all the latest knowledge, information and training in order to do their work efficiently.

On average, to have your springs replaced on your garage door will vary anywhere from $200 to as much as $400 if you were to hire a professional.  Breaking the costs down, the springs, depending on the part needed and the size, will cost about $20 to $60 each.  Add in the labor, which can be $45 to $85 per hour, depending on your location, can bring the grand total to the estimate noted.   A tilt-up door, on average, will be about 20 to 30 percent less than a roll-up door.
One of the best ways to care for your springs is to check them over for wear. You can certainly look at them for damage, but sometimes the damage isn’t something that’s visible. In these cases, try lifting the garage door up from the ground. About halfway up, let go. If the door stays, the springs are still working perfectly. If the door sags or drops at all, this could be a sign that your springs are beginning to weaken and will need replacing soon.
Although you should let professionals perform any tasks that require adjusting the tension on the springs, there are a few repairs you can do and maintenance tasks that extend the life of the door. One such repair is to tighten the nuts and bolts that hold the garage door and its track together. This also provides an opportunity to check the door and its parts for signs of wear and damage. You can also lubricate all the moving parts in the door, including the pulleys, bearings and springs. This shields the parts from dirt and helps reduce noise when the door opens and closes. Another job you can complete is installing an automatic garage door opener.

Slide the left spring onto the tube and add the cable drum. When your new springs arrive, put the new left spring (the 1 with the end facing up and to the left) on the torsion tube, making sure that the stationary cone on the end of the spring faces the center bracket. After sliding the new spring into place, replace the cable drum and insert the torsion bar into the left bearing bracket.[9]


Wheel Track Obstruction – Try closing the garage door manually to see if there are obstructions on the wheel tracks. If that is not the case, examine your tracks for potential damage like dents and bends. Look at your door to see if it is hanging unevenly. If the track is damaged or the door is hanging unevenly, it is time to call a professional for repairs. Track repairs can typically cost $133 to $154. Cost for correcting the uneven hanging of doors themselves can vary greatly, but typically cost about $125.
Standard torsion springs (about $40 each) have a service life of 7,000 to 10,000 open/close cycles. However, you can buy double-life (25,000 cycles) replacement springs for about $65 per spring. If you have a two-spring setup and one spring breaks, the second spring will break soon. So replace them both at the same time. To get the right springs for your door, you'll have to provide the supplier some details. Here's how:

Like any mechanical part, garage door springs deteriorate due to normal wear and tear. Over time, the steel that makes up the springs weakens until they eventually break. Under normal circumstances, garage door springs have a life expectancy of 10,000 cycles of opening and closing. This equates to five to seven years, but along the way, there may be signs of problems that can occur before the springs actually stop working.
9.14 Slide the springs to the bracket. Double-check to make sure you have the right wound spring on the left side and the left wind spring on the right side. Turn the springs until the ends are facing you. The wire at the ends of both torsion springs here at the bracket should be pointing down. At the winding cones at the opposite ends, the spring wire points up. If not, reverse the springs. About once a month we get a phone call from a do-it-yourself customer who begins the conversation with, "I wound the garage door spring to about six turns and the spring came loose from the cone." We normally refer them back to this step and suggest they switch their springs.
Garage Door Installation – This includes the installation of a new garage door. Includes the door itself, the track, cables, springs, hinges, handles, locks and rollers. It is the complete service and installation of a new door. We inspect all the parts, make adjustments to fit your garage opening, and service all elements during the installation process. Plus, we check to ensure all parts are in proper working order after installed.
Usually, when a garage door spring breaks the door has already closed or come down. In some instances, however, a spring can snap while the door is closing or in motion, causing the door to fall rapidly. In these situations, the door can become a safety concern for you and your family, so you should keep your distance and call a garage door professional as soon as possible. Garage doors are very heavy and can cause injury if not handled properly. When a garage door problem occurs, call a Sears Garage Door expert to help.
A garage door with aging springs puts an enormous load on a garage door opener, so another sign of failing springs is when you hear the electric door opener begin to strain as it attempts to lift the door. At this point, it is time to consider replacing the springs. Aging door springs can also break suddenly, a situation that can cause the door to slam shut violently. If you happen to be present when a spring breaks, you will hear a very loud sound like a gunshot, because the break usually occurs when the spring is fully loaded—stretched or twisted to its full tension. When one spring breaks, the door will suddenly feel very heavy when you try to open it by hand, and an automatic garage door opener may no longer be able to lift the door at all.
I've been watching TOH since 1981. I just happened to stumble across it on PBS during a repeat of the second season, was instantly taken with it - and, hooked-for-good. That particular show/season (the Newton/ H. H. Richardson House - 1981) remains my favorite. Also, I happened to meet Norm quite a few years back and he mentioned it as being his favorite, as well - all-the-more reason for me to have fond memories of it. If I were to pick more 'favorites' from the 'Bob-era', 'Steve-era' and 'Kevin-era' they would be: 'Bob-era' - the Lexington Bed & Breakfast (1988) and the In-and-Around Boston shows (1984); 'Steve-era' - the Concord Barn (Wickwire House - 1989), the Wayland House (Kirkside - 1991)) and the Jamaica Plain House (1990); 'Kevin-era' - the Cambridge House (2005), the Newton Shingle-style House (2007) and the Detroit Houses (2017).p.s. - I've very much enjoyed the times that the show has gone back and looked at previous projects. It's always nice to see how the home - and homeowners - have done over time. Thank you! 
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