My garage door torsion spring broke so I decided to replace it myself. Shipping was next day. I got the torsion spring rod at a local hardware store. Easy to install once I figure out how to lock down the rod from moving and loosening the door cable on the side. Instructions tells you how to do it. Great replacement spring and save $$$ doing it myself. https://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtube_gdata
The Torquemaster system has a lock built into each side on a double car door that will activate when a spring breaks causing the door to lock in the up position. It is very simple to deactivate this lock and get your door closed. But, you can guarantee you have a broken spring inside the Torquemaster tube on the side where the lock activated. You will need the spring inside replaced or have it converted over to a standard torsion spring set up, which is what we recommend and a service we perform quite frequently. A standard torsion spring will last 3 times longer than the small spring inside the Torquemaster tube.
Garage doors make life easier, particularly when you’re arriving home in the middle of a rainstorm. It’s easy to take the convenience a garage door provides for granted -- until it stops working properly. The door loses its visual appeal instantly, stuck there half-open. This type of situation also raises security concerns as a simple trip to the store can become a headache. Simple fixes when a garage door gets stuck halfway may prevent it from happening again.
If the door closes but then immediately pops open again, you'll need to check the limit settings, which help the mechanism determine how far to move the door in order to close it properly. If the settings are off, the door will hit the ground before the opener believes it should. It will assume that it has hit an obstacle and will automatically backtrack to avoid damage. Check the owner's manual or the buttons on the motor to adjust the limit settings. It may take some trial and error to get the setting just right.
If a roll-up door, assuming you have not put in cabinets or anything that prohibits sliding the shaft sideways about 2-3 feet out of the spring to change it, then about $200-250 should do it for a 2-car garage door. If he has to disassemble the brackets to remove the springs because the shaft cannot slide sideways enough to get the springs on/off, then probably another $50-100.

In this article, we’ll tell you the difference between a safe door and one that’s unsafe. We’ll also give you the helpful tips you’re not likely to find in the manufacturer’s instructions to correctly, and safely, install a new garage door with a torsion spring and do-it-yourself tensioning. Installing a new, double garage door yourself will save you several hundred dollars and should take eight to 12 hours if you’re fairly handy. You can do most of the new garage door installation project yourself, but you should recruit help for removing the old door. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c

Product was received in two days and was as advertised. Installing these myself saved around $150 but it took around 2-3 hours. I would imagine everyone's experience is going to be different. These springs appear to be heavier duty than the ones they replaced. I couldn't use the same slots for tension as the old ones and it was trial and error in adjusting the length of my pull cable until the door closed as it should. I need to replace the springs on my other garage door and would think that will take less than an hour based on what I learned from the first install.

Once you’ve decided it’s time to replace your garage door — whether the result of malfunctions or just seeking to modernize your home’s exteriors — you may be wondering how much a garage door replacement costs. While these numbers are often determined by several factors, including the materials and labor involved, on average, a garage door replacement can cost just over $1,000 but could range from about $300 to over $2,000.
The spring system opens and supports the garage door. These springs are under heavy force, which allows the door to bounce back open and avoids overburdening the garage door opener with the entire weight load. If these springs are stuck or broken, the whole system is affected. Start by lubricating the springs with non-silicon-based lubricant. If this fails, disconnect the garage door opener from the garage door to manually open the door. If you experience significant resistance, the springs might need to be replaced; a job that requires a professional.
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