First and foremost, a garage door, by design, contains springs designed to balance your door and make it easier to lift. Those springs are under incredible amounts of tension. If a spring breaks or is improperly released, it can cause incredible and potentially fatal injuries. Keep in mind, when working on a garage door spring, it is likely that your face and head will be close to it, meaning that your most sensitive area will be in the direct path of the released spring.

11.2a Raise the garage door slowly. Check the door balance. If you have the correct springs the door should stay down when closed, half way when opened half way, and open when opened. If the door will drop to the floor by itself from the halfway point, add 1/4 turn of tension to each of the torsion springs. If the garage door won't stay on the floor, and if it pulls itself up when stopped halfway, close the door and remove 1/4 turn of tension from the springs.


The winding and unwinding is done at a metal fitting, called a winding cone, attached to the outside end of the spring. You stick a winding bar into one of the four holes in the cone and use the bar as a lever to turn the cone. Once you've completed a quarter turn, insert the other bar into a different hole in the cone and let the bar lever against the closed garage door to hold the spring tension. This allows you to move the original bar to repeat the process, alternating the bars with each quarter-turn. It takes about 30 quarter-turns to fully tension a standard torsion spring.
8.5 Inspect the bearing. Lube it with motor oil, spray lithium, or spray lubriplate grease. Do not use WD-40. If the shaft is worn and the bearing is seized and you can't free it, replace the bearing. Or, if you have bearings labeled "ADH" we recommend replacing them. I find very few other bearings that need to be replaced. However, if you do need to replace the bearing and you do not have a new one, you can replace it at a later date. You'll find a quick way to do this at our End Bearing Plate Replacement instruction page.
Garage door springs can —and will—break, and if you're anywhere near the garage when this happens, you'll know it. Nothing else sounds quite like a giant metal spring snapping under tension. Even if you don't hear it, you'll know the spring broke as soon as you (or your garage door opener) try to lift the door and finds that it now weighs twice as much. So faced with a broken garage door spring, the question is, can you fix it yourself?
I got these replacement cables for my beach house garage door after the originals rusted and broke. These are twice the diameter of the OEM cables, and fit the door perfectly. The larger cables give piece of mind for both supporting the door and providing safety cables for the extension springs. Came with all the necessary hardware, and the installation was easy with the doors blocked in the up position.

One thing to consider - assuming you have 2 springs and an opener, unless the other spring is quite new, you should replace it at the same time, first because it will probably break fairly soon anyway and changing two is only about $50 more than changing one, and because the springs on both sides should be of equal stiffness - if not, then the door will be unevenly weight compensated and try to open cockeyed, increasing wear and risk of damaging the motor. http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c
Since garage doors come in all weights and sizes, the right springs need to be installed in order to properly balance the door. If a technician puts the wrong spring on your door, not only will this damage your garage door system, but it will cause the garage door opener to do more work than it was built to do. This is why Precision technicians only install the right springs for the door's weight and check their work by performing a balance test.
Our technicians are available round the clock, 7 days a week to take your call and provide you with emergency garage door service. We pride ourselves in providing you with assistance as you need it and when you need it. No matter the time of night or the kind of weather, when you call and need our assistance, you will always be a priority. That’s A1 service for you!

Garage door springs can —and will—break, and if you're anywhere near the garage when this happens, you'll know it. Nothing else sounds quite like a giant metal spring snapping under tension. Even if you don't hear it, you'll know the spring broke as soon as you (or your garage door opener) try to lift the door and finds that it now weighs twice as much. So faced with a broken garage door spring, the question is, can you fix it yourself?


It’s difficult to say how often the springs will need to be replaced since it’s different for everyone. It depends on how often you use your garage door, how cold and long your winters are, how well you maintain your springs and many other factors. The best rule of the thumb is to check your springs regularly for signs of wear and damage and to replace them when they begin to appear tired.

Garage Door Repair Cost Centennial 80016


The average lifespan of torsion springs is determined by its cycle count. Garage Door Medics provides springs with an average of 25,000 cycles and we can provide custom size springs for any door. The industry standard is 10,000 cycles. When a garage door is used more frequently, the springs may not last as long. If you begin to see signs of wear, it’s time to give Garage Door Medics a call!
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