There are lots of ways your garage door can suffer damage. The tracking might be rusted or broken, the weatherstripping might need to be replaced or the door itself might actually be broken or have a hole in it. After all, garage doors are sturdy but not unbreakable. One component of your garage door in particular that will likely need replacing every so often is the spring.
Not only was the upward-lifting garage door and the electric garage door opener invented by Overhead Door Corporation’s founder C.G Johnson in the 1920s, but we also have a tradition in excellence for garage door repair, service and maintenance. Even with the most reliable products problems can arise and when they do it’s important to know who to contact to fix these issues while providing solutions to prevent future complications.
The technician, Robert Helton, was very pleasant, helpful, and professional. He repaired the garage door opener expeditiously and explained why it hadn't worked properly. He also checked the chain mechanism and the door itself and showed me how to manually work the door should I need to do that in the future. I was very pleased with this repair work.
Garage doors have tension springs and cables that help to slowly and safely lower your door while closing. If these tension springs or cables break, you might find that your garage door closes really fast, often with a loud bang when it hits the ground. This is very dangerous as there is nothing preventing the garage door from crushing something that might be below it. It’s best to call a garage door professional as soon as you can to have them come out and repair these cables or springs.

The most common question we get over the phone is, "Okay, so how much does it cost to replace garage door springs?" To give you an exact price quote, we would need to know the size of the door, weight, and type of garage door springs needed (torsion or extension). Since we carry over 30 different types of springs to account for all the different types of garage doors, we recommend that a certified technician takes the proper measurements himself before giving you an exact price quote.

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10.8 After the cone reaches the mark, continue pulling the bar off the garage door and back toward the middle of the door with your left hand. Tighten both set screws 1/2 to 3/4 turns each after each screw first meets the shaft. This is the point at which you will feel the screw meeting resistance. If the garage door spring snakes after tightening the set screws, repeat the process and stretch the spring half as much as before. Residential torsion springs are stretched 1/8" to 1/4". Larger commercial and industrial overhead garage door torsion springs are stretched as much as an inch.

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6.8 Properly tightened screws will loosen with less than a turn. Once you loosen a set screw, keep at least one bar in the cone AT ALL TIMES until the spring is fully unwound. Many cones have been over-tightened. The spring may unwind 1/4 turn and not unwind any more until one of the set screws is loosened some more. You may need to completely remove the set screws. The shaft may be distorted and the cone still may not unwind at all.

If the track is misaligned, but the door still moves, there are a few things you can do to attempt to remedy the issue on your own. You’ll know that it’s misaligned if you hear a rubbing noise when the garage door reaches a certain spot on the tracks each time it opens and closes. Sometimes the door may even slow down slightly when it hits this spot.


DIYers are generally steered away from working with torsion springs because installed springs are always under tension. To safely remove a torsion spring, you have to control the tension by holding the spring with a solid metal winding bar, then you loosen the spring from the rod and manually unwind the spring using two winding rods. The spring is potentially dangerous until it is fully unwound. By contrast, extension springs have little or no tension when the garage door is fully open.
When a garage door service company gets a phone call in reference to a broken spring, the first thing the homeowner usually says is “the cables are broken”. This makes sense because the cables on a garage door will fly every which way, fall to the ground, become disconnected from the door, or even get caught in between the garage door and the jamb. It is rare for cables to break or need replacing when a garage door spring breaks. If your garage door has two torsion springs, the second spring will keep the cables tight and on the drums. You will have to look up at the springs to determine if one is broken.
10.5 If the spring comes loose from the cone at about 6 turns, you are probably winding the spring backward because the springs are on the wrong sides. Switch the springs. Otherwise, after winding the torsion springs, you will need to stretch the springs and secure the winding cone. First, mark the shaft 1/4" beyond the winding cone with tape or with a file. We stretch the springs because the shaft floats horizontally between the flexible end bearing plates as the garage door operates. Although this may be as little as 1/4" the binding of the coils as the door closes often keeps the door from closing completely, especially when the springs and bearings are dry and need lubrication.
DIYers are generally steered away from working with torsion springs because installed springs are always under tension. To safely remove a torsion spring, you have to control the tension by holding the spring with a solid metal winding bar, then you loosen the spring from the rod and manually unwind the spring using two winding rods. The spring is potentially dangerous until it is fully unwound. By contrast, extension springs have little or no tension when the garage door is fully open.
My garage door torsion spring broke so I decided to replace it myself. Shipping was next day. I got the torsion spring rod at a local hardware store. Easy to install once I figure out how to lock down the rod from moving and loosening the door cable on the side. Instructions tells you how to do it. Great replacement spring and save $$$ doing it myself. https://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtube_gdata
10.2 Tape your winding bars if you have not done so already, not only to assure that you are inserting the bars completely into the cones as you wind the torsion springs, but more importantly to assure that the bar does not slip out of the cone when you stretch the springs at the end. This has happened to me several times. Professionals always stretch torsion springs after winding them because the shaft floats horizontally between the flexible end bearing plates as the door operates. Although this may be as little as 1/4", the binding of the coils as the garage door closes oftentimes keeps the door from closing completely, especially when the torsion springs and bearings are dry.
I went on Garage Door Nation website to look at the conversion chart from 1 to 2 torsion springs. For my 1 spring, size 2"/0.250ID/30.5" length, they recommended 2 of 2"/0.207ID/24" length. I got this kit from Amazon for $64 with $11 overnight shipping even though I could get free shipping through Prime over the weekend, but I couldn't wait for 3 more painful days. Installed it followed YouTube video. Worked better than my old one, a lot quieter. Check the video if you want to install one yourself. Professional installation costs hundreds of $$$:
No matter what kind of door you are installing, be very careful. The instructions that follow are merely guidelines. You should read your garage door manufacturer's instructions and owner's manual very carefully before attempting either type of installation. And if you're a do-it-yourself greenhorn, skip this project and hire an experienced professional. It may be more expensive, but garage door installation is on the higher scale of DIY difficulty.

I told several people that I planned on installing a garage door torsion spring after mine broke. ALL of them told me that it was too dangerous and a few feared for my life! Honestly it was one of the simplest home repairs I have ever done. That is thanks in large part to your very helpful installation video. Your videos on measuring springs etc. were also very helpful. All of the necessary details are there.

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To realign the track, first loosen the screws that hold the track to the frame. Then, gently tap the track with a rubber mallet to move it back into the proper position. Use a level to ensure it’s perfectly straight. Once you have the alignment correct, tighten the screws securely to ensure the track won’t move and cause more issues when opening your garage door. You’ll need to repeat this same process on the other tracks as well, as these may also be out of alignment.
Not only was the upward-lifting garage door and the electric garage door opener invented by Overhead Door Corporation’s founder C.G Johnson in the 1920s, but we also have a tradition in excellence for garage door repair, service and maintenance. Even with the most reliable products problems can arise and when they do it’s important to know who to contact to fix these issues while providing solutions to prevent future complications.
A1 Garage Door Service is the trusted service provider in installing, servicing and repairing all kinds and types of garage doors. We encourage you to check out the reviews of the people of Albuquerqueon the kind of garage door service that we provide. Our customers have consistently given us A+ ratings on BBB, 5-star ratings on Yelp and the Super Service Award on Angie’s List to express their satisfaction on our service.
6.4 Test the fit of the bar in the cone before loosening a set screw. Insert one end of your winding bar into one of the holes of the winding cone. Pull down on the bar slightly to make sure the set screws are tight. Position your ruler between the bar and the garage door. Move the bottom of the bar from side to side and measure the play. It should be less than an inch and a half. If it is over 2" either get someone else to change your springs or have someone make some bars that will properly fit the cones.
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