I've been watching TOH since 1981. I just happened to stumble across it on PBS during a repeat of the second season, was instantly taken with it - and, hooked-for-good. That particular show/season (the Newton/ H. H. Richardson House - 1981) remains my favorite. Also, I happened to meet Norm quite a few years back and he mentioned it as being his favorite, as well - all-the-more reason for me to have fond memories of it. If I were to pick more 'favorites' from the 'Bob-era', 'Steve-era' and 'Kevin-era' they would be: 'Bob-era' - the Lexington Bed & Breakfast (1988) and the In-and-Around Boston shows (1984); 'Steve-era' - the Concord Barn (Wickwire House - 1989), the Wayland House (Kirkside - 1991)) and the Jamaica Plain House (1990); 'Kevin-era' - the Cambridge House (2005), the Newton Shingle-style House (2007) and the Detroit Houses (2017).p.s. - I've very much enjoyed the times that the show has gone back and looked at previous projects. It's always nice to see how the home - and homeowners - have done over time. Thank you! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop
Homeowners have long been warned that torsion springs are extremely dangerous to work with and that replacing them must be left to a professional. But these claims are somewhat exaggerated. If you understand how they work, and you pay attention to what you're doing, you can replace them safely and surprisingly easily. Granted, they're a little spooky to work with at first (partly due to their reputation), but this is a good thing—you really don't want to forget that they're under tension. Thinking about every step — before you take it — is the key to staying safe.

So your garage door is acting up, but you aren’t sure what the problem is. Maybe the door spring is one possible culprit, but you’re not sure if that’s actually the problem or if it’s something else. In this quick list, we’ll go through the most common broken garage door spring symptoms. If your garage door is exhibiting one or a few of these symptoms, there’s a good chance it’s broken and needs replacing.
There are two types of garage door springs: torsion and extension. Torsion springs are horizontal and located near the top of the garage door. Check for a gap between these springs indicating a break. Springs on the sides of the garage door are extension springs. Inspect them to see if one or both of them have broken. If you have a broken spring, call a garage door technician to fix it for you as soon as possible. Never operate a garage door with a broken spring; it could severely damage the door and the operating system. Never attempt to replace a broken spring on your own, either. Replacing broken garage door springs is very dangerous for anyone other than a certified, professional repair technician.
• Extension springs: Garage door extension springs stretch to provide lifting power for the door. These springs are typically made of steel and mounted above the horizontal track of the garage door. A safety cable should run through your extension springs to prevent possible injuries or property damage. Extension springs are the most common type of garage door spring for residential use and can break after excessive usage.
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