Step 5: Check for loose hardware, and tighten as needed. On swing-up doors, check the plates where the spring is mounted to be sure the screws are tight, and tighten any loose screws. On roll-up doors, check the hinges that hold the sections of the door together; tighten any loose screws, and replace any damaged hinges. Sagging at one side of the door can often be corrected by servicing the hinges. If a screw hole is enlarged, replace the screw with a longer one of the same diameter, and use a hollow fiber plug, dipped in carpenters' glue, with the new screw. If the wood is cracked at a hinge, remove the hinge and fill the cracks and the screw holes with wood filler. Let the filler dry and then replace the hinge. If possible, move the hinge onto solid wood.
You can choose from three basic types of steel door: (1) steel only; (2) steel with insulation on the inside; and (3) steel on both sides with 1-3/8 to 2 in. of insulation. Other features that add to the cost are thicker insulation and windows, especially insulated windows. The do-it-yourself tensioning systems also add a little to the door’s cost. Be sure to specify exactly what you want.

The springs are an essential component to your garage door in that they enable the door to be lifted or lowered easily, despite its weight. If either of the springs are broken, then the door will become stuck. There are two types of garage door springs – torsion springs and extension springs. Torsion springs are located near the top of the door, whereas extension springs are located on each side of the door. If your garage door uses torsion springs, check for a gap between the springs to identify whether they are broken. If you have extension springs, look to see if a piece of the springs are hanging from the side.
If you want to do the repair yourself, get several phone estimates first, because rates vary widely among service companies. Most garage doors are heavy (200 to 300 lbs.), so call in three strong friends to help you lift the door and hold it open while you lock it in the full raised position with a locking pliers. Then move your vehicles and have your friends help you lower the door.

The following instructions for replacing garage door springs are for do-it-yourself homeowners and for maintenance repair men who service their smaller commercial or industrial sectional overhead doors. These directions are designed for torsion springs mounted to both sides of an anchor bracket above the middle of the garage door as pictured above. Instructions for replacing a single torsion spring, for replacing garage door extension springs, and for replacing Wayne Dalton Torquemaster springs are linked to our DIY Instructions page above. You'll also find a link for any other garage door parts you may need while repairing your door.
There’s another reason new doors are superior to old ones: energy efficiency. Keep in mind, garage doors are large, and when they open, they let a lot of outside air into your home. While you may have significant insulation separating your garage from the rest of your home, eventually that temperature differential will start to influence your energy bills.
Garage doors are able to move due to a counterbalance system that usually consists of a torsion spring. We often find incorrect springs have been installed which result in an unsafe door that you may not be able to open manually when needed. The balance of your garage door should be tested annually to reduce wear on your garage door opener and ensure it can be opened if an emergency situation arises. Because of the dangers involved with torsion springs, garage door spring repair and installation should only be done by experienced professionals like our Medics.
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