Rolling sectional overhead garage door spring replacement should cost somewhere between $195 to $300 for a quality set springs (50000 cycle rating). This price will very if the garage door repair company charges a service call fee (trip charge). The most important thing to consider along with price is the quality of the springs and the warranty. There are any company that we use lower or mid quality springs and charge on the higher end because they include a lifetime warranty on the springs. The catch is that this warranty will only covers the spring for life and labor only for 30 days to a year. Look for a company that offers a equal parts and labor warranty. This insures that the warranty represents the rating of the springs that are being installed. For instants, you may buy a 1500 cycle rated spring set (last 3 years +or-) for $200 with a lifetime warranty and 1 year on labor. When a spring brakes after 3 year the spring its self is covered but the labor cost to replace the warranty spring can be between $65 to $100. This can add up over the year as the warranty will not restart at the time of the warranty replacement. On the offer hand, if you purchase a set of springs rated at 50000 cycles (last 10 year +or-) for $270 with a 10 year parts and labor warranty and a spring brakes in 8 years it would be replace at $0 cost. A must batter value! Always check service company review and get the details on the quality of springs a garage door repair company uses and the warranty, part and "labor".

I'm getting a good laugh on all the comments on "Garage Door Nation" on how easy they or people make it sound to order and change out their torsion springs. First off, if you do your shopping, the savings is about $50 - $75 having a company do it. Is it worth the 3 days wait without the use of your garage door, the safety risk and your time doing it yourself? If yes, then go for it!


If you are in an emergency situation, you can lift the door manually while using the garage door opener, but this is not recommended. The door could get stuck halfway up and then slam the rest of the way down. This could cause injury. The ideal solution is to call a Twin Cities garage door repair company to come quickly and repair the spring so that normal operation can be restored and so you are not in a situation where you find yourself having to attempt manual lift with or without the assistance of the opener.

Most garage doors from the past 15-20 years have a photo eye which detects if a person or object is blocking the door from lowering all the way. The photo eye will be about 4-6 inches off of the ground for most doors, with an eye that is about the size of a pea. It shoots a laser across the length of the garage that, if interrupted, will cut off the signal used to lower and raise the door.

Over time, the springs in your garage door can wear down and break. While the average cost to repair garage door springs is between $100 and $200, in some cases you may need to replace them instead. Replacement can cost $20-$30 for springs plus labor which can cost up to $180. Here are some signs to watch out for when determining whether repair or replacement is the right course of action:
First and foremost, a garage door, by design, contains springs designed to balance your door and make it easier to lift. Those springs are under incredible amounts of tension. If a spring breaks or is improperly released, it can cause incredible and potentially fatal injuries. Keep in mind, when working on a garage door spring, it is likely that your face and head will be close to it, meaning that your most sensitive area will be in the direct path of the released spring.
If the door closes but then immediately pops open again, you'll need to check the limit settings, which help the mechanism determine how far to move the door in order to close it properly. If the settings are off, the door will hit the ground before the opener believes it should. It will assume that it has hit an obstacle and will automatically backtrack to avoid damage. Check the owner's manual or the buttons on the motor to adjust the limit settings. It may take some trial and error to get the setting just right.
If your door has two springs, most professionals and research online says that replacing both springs is the best option. Most torsion springs are rated for 10,000 close/open cycles. If only one of your springs is broken, both springs are still recommended to be replaced. Considering that your second spring will break soon anyways, this added on fix is only going to cost you about $50 extra to assure that you don’t have to pay another service fee for a second visit.
While it would be wonderful if door springs lasted forever, the reality is that the simple act of opening and shutting the door multiple times every day isn’t easy. It’s hard on the springs, even though they’re built to do it. Most springs will last for a while, but they won’t last forever. The regular wear and tear of endlessly opening and shutting the door breaks them down and eventually, they’ll need to be replaced.

In this article, we’ll tell you the difference between a safe door and one that’s unsafe. We’ll also give you the helpful tips you’re not likely to find in the manufacturer’s instructions to correctly, and safely, install a new garage door with a torsion spring and do-it-yourself tensioning. Installing a new, double garage door yourself will save you several hundred dollars and should take eight to 12 hours if you’re fairly handy. You can do most of the new garage door installation project yourself, but you should recruit help for removing the old door. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
6.4 Test the fit of the bar in the cone before loosening a set screw. Insert one end of your winding bar into one of the holes of the winding cone. Pull down on the bar slightly to make sure the set screws are tight. Position your ruler between the bar and the garage door. Move the bottom of the bar from side to side and measure the play. It should be less than an inch and a half. If it is over 2" either get someone else to change your springs or have someone make some bars that will properly fit the cones.
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