Aging garage door springs cause the door to effectively "weigh" more as the steel loses its resiliency. With new springs, a heavy garage door should take no more than about 10 pounds of force to lift into an open position. With springs nearing the end of their lifespan, the force required to lift the door can be considerably more, since a garage door may weigh 200 pounds or more.
We look out for the safety of our customers and their families. That’s why we do not sell garage door torsion springs separately to consumers, and it’s also why we recommend putting your broken garage door in the hands of our experienced technicians. At Garage Door Medics, we are licensed, bonded, and insured. We have completed thousands of garage door installations and spring repairs, and we make sure they are done safely and with the right springs for your garage door system.
2.3 Beware of older winding cones. These older Crawford and McKee torsion spring cones were made for 5/8" bars. Sometimes, however, the holes are too small for 5/8" bars. Whatever you do, don't use a 1/2" bar; instead, grind down a 5/8" bar to fit. I recently had a McKee spring let loose after winding because I used a 1/2" bar when my 5/8" bar wouldn't fit. Just before it let loose I was telling myself, "This is not safe." And it wasn't. The only safe way to replace these older springs is to make a winding bar for each hole of each cone. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube.be&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
R-value describes the power of the insulation in your door. The higher the r-value, the stronger the insulation. Those doors will have better energy efficiency than doors that have a low r-value. Basic doors have an r-value of 0.0 with no insulation. The first step up gives you 1-3/8” insulation at a 6.5 rating. Next, a 1-3/8” thickness with Intellicore has a 12.9 r-value. The best option on the market is the 18.4 r-value, which has 2” Intellicore insulation.
These instructions were first posted in 2005, and they were updated in August of 2008. I have been frank about the hazards of garage door repairs and about my own accidents incurred while replacing torsion springs. For what it's worth, you might be surprised to know that I, too, have benefitted from producing these instructions. I have not had any garage door accidents since we first published these on the web in 2005. And, in as much as I have helped keep other DIY-ers out of the emergency room, I consider myself somewhat of a medical practitioner. 

A garage door spring replacement should cost between $175 and $225 for a single tension spring and between $250 and $300 for two tension springs. Most garage door companies carry a wide enough variety of spring sizes to cover most residential doors. As long as the proper amount of turns are put on the spring, there are more than one correct springs to use for any one door.
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