Most residential garage doors have one of two types of springs: torsion or extension. Torsion springs are heavy-duty springs mounted to a metal rod that runs parallel to the door, directly above the door opening. These springs are loaded, or tensioned, with a twisting action. When the door closes, cables attached to the bottom corners of the door pull on pulleys attached to the ends of the metal rod the springs are mounted on. The pulleys turn the rod, which twists the springs and creates tension. When the door is opened, the springs unwind and help lift the door.
Whether you're planning on moving in the future or you're fixing up your forever home, replacing a garage door can provide an excellent return on investment and boost your home's resale value. According to Remodeling magazine's 2016 Cost vs. Value report, garage door upgrades provide a nationwide average return on investment of over 90%, making it one of the top five home improvement projects. To learn more about the cost of installing garage doors, visit our garage door and opener installation and repair cost guide.
These instructions were first posted in 2005, and they were updated in August of 2008. I have been frank about the hazards of garage door repairs and about my own accidents incurred while replacing torsion springs. For what it's worth, you might be surprised to know that I, too, have benefitted from producing these instructions. I have not had any garage door accidents since we first published these on the web in 2005. And, in as much as I have helped keep other DIY-ers out of the emergency room, I consider myself somewhat of a medical practitioner. 

Garage door springs can —and will—break, and if you're anywhere near the garage when this happens, you'll know it. Nothing else sounds quite like a giant metal spring snapping under tension. Even if you don't hear it, you'll know the spring broke as soon as you (or your garage door opener) try to lift the door and finds that it now weighs twice as much. So faced with a broken garage door spring, the question is, can you fix it yourself?

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These instructions were first posted in 2005, and they were updated in August of 2008. I have been frank about the hazards of garage door repairs and about my own accidents incurred while replacing torsion springs. For what it's worth, you might be surprised to know that I, too, have benefitted from producing these instructions. I have not had any garage door accidents since we first published these on the web in 2005. And, in as much as I have helped keep other DIY-ers out of the emergency room, I consider myself somewhat of a medical practitioner. http://m.youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c
Install new or use this right-wound torsion spring Install new or use this right-wound torsion spring to replace broken sectional garage door torsion springs. All DURA-LIFT springs meet the DASMA standard rating of 10 000 plus door open and close cycles. Both the winding and stationary cones are professionally installed for safe operation. Winding rod is included with ...  More + Product Details Close
8.5 Inspect the bearing. Lube it with motor oil, spray lithium, or spray lubriplate grease. Do not use WD-40. If the shaft is worn and the bearing is seized and you can't free it, replace the bearing. Or, if you have bearings labeled "ADH" we recommend replacing them. I find very few other bearings that need to be replaced. However, if you do need to replace the bearing and you do not have a new one, you can replace it at a later date. You'll find a quick way to do this at our End Bearing Plate Replacement instruction page.
Garage doors make life easier, particularly when you’re arriving home in the middle of a rainstorm. It’s easy to take the convenience a garage door provides for granted -- until it stops working properly. The door loses its visual appeal instantly, stuck there half-open. This type of situation also raises security concerns as a simple trip to the store can become a headache. Simple fixes when a garage door gets stuck halfway may prevent it from happening again. http://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
Lower the door and dismantle it by removing the hardware. Lower a double door by recruiting at least two helpers to help with the weight, and place a 2×4 block under the door to prevent smashing a foot or finger when it’s lowered. Remove the sections one at a time by disconnecting the rollers and brackets. If you have windows, tape them to help control flying shards if they break. Then remove the old roller tracks and remaining hardware.

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I told several people that I planned on installing a garage door torsion spring after mine broke. ALL of them told me that it was too dangerous and a few feared for my life! Honestly it was one of the simplest home repairs I have ever done. That is thanks in large part to your very helpful installation video. Your videos on measuring springs etc. were also very helpful. All of the necessary details are there.

Measure the various areas where the door will be installed: door-opening height and width, headroom (from top of opening to ceiling), and back room (length of garage). For the headroom, you should have about 10" to 12" of space, depending on the spring system you're installing. For the back room, you should have the door height, plus another 18" or more of space.
I got these replacement cables for my beach house garage door after the originals rusted and broke. These are twice the diameter of the OEM cables, and fit the door perfectly. The larger cables give piece of mind for both supporting the door and providing safety cables for the extension springs. Came with all the necessary hardware, and the installation was easy with the doors blocked in the up position.
I got these replacement cables for my beach house garage door after the originals rusted and broke. These are twice the diameter of the OEM cables, and fit the door perfectly. The larger cables give piece of mind for both supporting the door and providing safety cables for the extension springs. Came with all the necessary hardware, and the installation was easy with the doors blocked in the up position.
If you have a 1-spring system, you can choose to upgrade to a 2-spring system. The 2-spring system will make your springs last longer since it balances the weight on two instead of just one spring. It is not required but recommended. To convert to 2-springs, you will first need to find the measurements of your one spring and then use the form on our website to convert to a 2-spring system or just contact us. We will take care of you 24/7 via our online support.
4.4 Take the spring on the left and place it at the left end of the door as pictured here. Notice that the end of the wire points to the right toward the center of the door. This is a right wind torsion spring. It will go above the garage door on the left side of the spring anchor bracket. The winding cone at the other end of this spring is usually painted red.
Thanks for asking for our input. I have enjoyed the 'Future House' episodes that you folks have created. And, I think that the amount of segments-per-season seems just about right - any more and it might begin to take the shows into an area that moves away from their core meaning (i.e. - home repair/rehab/construction, etc). Though, it's easy to understand how new and upcoming technologies fit well into TOH/ATOH's overall picture. Also, Ross Trethewey is a good sement host - very knoledgable and enthusiastic - and, as well, he gives the TOH/ATOH audience some 'younger blood' to continue forward with the show's traditions. My thoughts are to stick with 'Future House' segments.And, thanks for all of the good work you folks do in continuing to present to us each year such wonderful productions as TOH and ATOH, which we get to enjoy and benefit so greatly from!
If a roll-up door, assuming you have not put in cabinets or anything that prohibits sliding the shaft sideways about 2-3 feet out of the spring to change it, then about $200-250 should do it for a 2-car garage door. If he has to disassemble the brackets to remove the springs because the shaft cannot slide sideways enough to get the springs on/off, then probably another $50-100.
In most cases, only one spring breaks or wears out at a time, and you can get away with replacing just the failed spring. But this is a little like replacing old car tires one at a time. You'll get the best performance if all the springs are new and have the same strength. Extension springs are replaced individually, making it more tempting to replace just one. With torsion springs, you have to disassemble everything to replace either spring, so it makes sense to swap out both springs during the repair.
If your garage door track is out of alignment, it can be a serious issue. The metal track your door runs on needs to be aligned properly in order for your door to move. If you see gaps between the rollers and rail, or bends in the rails themselves, you have a problem. The heavy weight of the door can compound these issues and make them worse until it becomes dangerous to operate your door.

Luckily, there is a bit of science to questions of garage door repair and replacement. That’s why we’ve put together this guide on when to replace a garage door. We’ll prepare you to compare repair vs replacement garage door costs. We’ll discuss the ways in which repairs are the most affordable option while also exploring those moments when replacement will in the end provide you with more value added.


When you hire a professional, the first thing they will do is turn off the power as a safety precaution.  They will then measure the existing door springs to make sure the new springs they order or have in stock fit accordingly.  With these new springs, they will unwind the existing springs and install the new ones in its place, tightening them with screws.  When tightened, the springs will be balanced, lubricated and the springs will be wound up.  Lastly, the door will be tested and the tracks will be lubricated to move efficiently. https://youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
Weather conditions can make rails expand or contract slightly, which requires a little extra pressure from the opener to compensate. Turning the force-adjustment screw increases or decreases the force. However, adjusting the force is not something to play around with unless you are confident you know what you’re doing. The force adjustment signals the opener to stop and reverse when objects are detected in the closing path. Too little force and just about anything will trigger it to stop, but too much force and the garage door might not respond to resistance from something or someone in the path when the door is trying to close.
If the door won’t move at all because of an alignment issue, then this problem isn’t one that you should try to tackle yourself. A garage door professional will have the necessary equipment needed to safely realign and repair your garage door. Additionally, if the track misalignment is beyond repair, a professional can install a new garage door track for you. https://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=Z_eZc-kh40c&u=watch?v=XXXXXX&feature=share

The low rating on the CS is due to the fact that inwas out of town and my wife called because the garage door wouldn't open. We had repairs to the only other exit, and the CS said because it could be opened manually, it was no emergency. She was stuck in the house for over Sixteen hours. No emergency crew came out. Steve, a tech who came out the first time, fixed the door. It is not his fault CS took their sweet time to help a 45 year customer. I commend Steve. I do NOT have anything good to say about CS.
Install new or use this right-wound torsion spring Install new or use this right-wound torsion spring to replace broken sectional garage door torsion springs. All DURA-LIFT springs meet the DASMA standard rating of 10 000 plus door open and close cycles. Both the winding and stationary cones are professionally installed for safe operation. Winding rod is included with ...  More + Product Details Close

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Over time, the springs in your garage door can wear down and break. While the average cost to repair garage door springs is between $100 and $200, in some cases you may need to replace them instead. Replacement can cost $20-$30 for springs plus labor which can cost up to $180. Here are some signs to watch out for when determining whether repair or replacement is the right course of action:
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