Although garage door springs can break during any season and at any time, they most commonly break during the winter. This has to do with the temperature change. When the temperature sinks below a specific threshold, the metal will contract. This means it’s extremely possible for your door springs to shrink slightly during the winter months. This is hard on the springs and makes them more likely to break.
When it comes to garage doors, functionality and safety are equally important in the eyes of Sears Garage Door technicians. Our associates know the importance of garage door safety and the hazards that a faulty garage door can pose for your family. To confirm that your garage door and opener operate safely, our technicians perform a 20-point safety check during maintenance calls and repair jobs. This safety check verifies that any repair work performed has been done correctly and that there are no lingering safety problems with your door and mechanisms. If our technician discovers any safety concerns, he’ll advise you on the best way to proceed with correcting the problem.
The problem is that one of the garage doors "catches" (i.e. stops) while going up at about 2 feet off the ground ~90% of the time. When the button is pressed again, it goes all the way down. This cycle can be repeated ad nauseum, or I can give the door a gentle tug upward just before the "Sticking" point, and this will give the door enough "impetus" to make it all the way up.
Garage door springs offset the weight of a garage door and allow the door to be opened and closed easily, either by hand or by an automatic garage door opener. The high-tension steel in the springs has a limited lifespan, and over time, the springs lose their effectiveness. Garage door springs come in levels of quality—they may be described as "10,000-use" or "20,000-use" springs, for example. This may sound like a very large number, but when you consider that a garage door might be opened four or five times a day, every day, every year, it becomes clear that there is a limited lifespan for these critical garage door parts.
Order replacement springs. Many manufacturers and distributors only provide torsion springs to professionals, and won’t sell them directly to the customer. Luckily, they are available on the Internet, so search online to find replacement springs. Make sure they match the coil size, length, and interior diameter of the springs you removed. Also, be sure to order both a “left-hand” and a “right-hand” spring as the coils are wound in different directions.[8] 

The spring system opens and supports the garage door. These springs are under heavy force, which allows the door to bounce back open and avoids overburdening the garage door opener with the entire weight load. If these springs are stuck or broken, the whole system is affected. Start by lubricating the springs with non-silicon-based lubricant. If this fails, disconnect the garage door opener from the garage door to manually open the door. If you experience significant resistance, the springs might need to be replaced; a job that requires a professional.
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